Wednesday, June 25, 2008

The End of the Age of Innocence? Why More Kids Are Turning to Drugs At Such an Early Age

FFH Note: Like it or not, we as parents do see the evidence of drug use in our community. Here's the challenge: Talk to your kids: know what they are doing. Give them the support they need to say "no."

/24-7PressRelease/ - In recent months there has been a large increase in teens and young adults abusing both illegal and prescription drugs. According to http://www.drugwarfacts.org approximately 17,000 deaths per year are drug related. Other reports indicate that amongst those numbers 1,400 are due to teen overdoses.

"Drug prevention starts at home, with the need for parents to educate their kids of the dangers of substance abuse," says Stephen Della Valle, author of Rising Above the Influence: A True Story About Alcohol, Drugs and Recovery. "Parents are the first and most important line of defense against teenage drug use."

"The reason for the sudden increase in use amongst teens is the accessibility of both prescription and over-the-counter drugs," says Stephen. "Kids are lulled into thinking prescription drugs are safe and not as hazardous as illegal "street" drugs such as cocaine or heroin," says Stephen.

Reports from the U.S. Department of National Drug Control Policy indicate that 2.1 million teenagers abused prescription drugs in recent years and the most commonly abused drug amongst twelve to thirteen-year-olds was also prescription drugs.

As president of Turning Point Rehabilitation Center in Verona, NJ, Stephen is very adamant about bringing awareness to parents for the need to lock medication up and not allow it to be available at will.

"It is proven that children are less likely to experiment with any type of drug if their parents talk to them regularly about them," says Stephen. "Addiction is a serious issue that ruins lives, tears families apart, and has will lead to only one of two places—jail or death."

Stephen is all too familiar with the drug addict lifestyle. In Rising Above the Influence, he candidly recounts his indoctrination into the world of substance abuse as a young teenager; and the desperate, sometimes morbidly comical situations he endured to support his heavy addictions to heroin, prescription drugs, cocaine and alcohol.

"I believe my book can help people who have struggled with addiction or know somebody that have," says Stephen. "If I am able to help just one person through my book then it will be a huge success."

Rising Above the Influence is Stephen's honest and inspiring account of the depths one man can fall to—and the heights he can achieve if only he reaches out a hand for help.

Tuesday, June 24, 2008

Maternity Center at Piedmont Fayette Hospital Offers Classes for Expecting Parents

Parents and expectant parents are invited to attend several informative classes offered by the Maternity Center at Piedmont Fayette Hospital (PFH). For more information on the Maternity Center at PFH, visit www.fayettehospital.org. Community members are invited to take part in the following classes:

Prepared Childbirth Class - This course, recommended for women 20 to 28 weeks into pregnancy, provides an eight hour childbirth education class that teaches mom and her partner about what to expect during labor and delivery. The instructor will discuss the stages of labor, relaxation, breathing techniques, common concerns, comfort measures and much more. Participants will need to bring two pillows and a blanket or towel. The fee for the course is $85 and includes light refreshments. The class will be held Saturday, July 19 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Dietary Conference Room on the ground floor of the hospital. To sign-up call Link2Health toll-free at 1-866-900-4321. For more information call 770-719-6305.

Breastfeeding Basics - The Maternity Center at Piedmont Fayette Hospital offers a three hour group participation discussion on the benefits and how-to's of breastfeeding. This class includes preparing for breastfeeding and getting started in the hospital and at home, special situations and growing a breastfeeding family. The class is best if done prior to delivery, but participants are welcome at any time. Fathers and grandparents are welcomed and encouraged to attend also. This class is offered July 12, September 13 and November 8 at 9 a.m. in Conference Room C on the third floor of the hospital's 1279 Building. To sign-up call Link2Health toll-free at 1-866-900-4321. For more information call 770-719-6305.

Moms in Motion - “Moms in Motion” is a fitness program designed to prepare women for the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy and postpartum. The class combines low impact aerobics, toning exercises, relaxation and breathing techniques and appropriate warm-ups/cool-downs perfect for both pregnant and postpartum women. The program provides not only a safe and effective exercise regime, but also provides valuable information on pregnancy, postpartum and child safety. Participants may register for this ongoing program at any time during or after pregnancy. Classes are held every Tuesday and Thursday from 5:45 to 6:30 p.m. in Suite 200 of the Piedmont Fayette Hospital Fitness Center at 1250 Hwy 54 West. Space is limited. The classes are FREE to fitness center members, and $25 per month for non-members. Written approval from a physician is required. For more information or to register, call 770-719-7290.

Maternity Center Tours - The Maternity Center at Piedmont Fayette Hospital welcomes expectant mothers and their families to take a tour of the facility. The tour will be offered on Saturday, July 12 and July 19 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. The tour will provide information on the hospital's approach to maternity care and how physicians and staff help new mothers and their babies before and after delivery. Please meet in the Maternity Center lobby (third floor, enter through the West Entrance) and sign in. For more information call 770-719-6305.

Fayette County Safe Kids Child Passenger Safety Training Class - Fayette County Safe Kids will offer a car seat safety class to teach parents how to keep children safe, especially while traveling by car. The course will be offered Monday, July 14 from 3 to 5 p.m. in Conference Room A on the third floor of the hospital's 1279 Building. This class is offered the second Monday of each month. For more information or to register, call 770-631-0743, ext. 150.

Sunday, June 22, 2008

Eat Fruits and Veggies to Lose Weight & Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

(NAPSI)-If you have a family history of diabetes, or you've been told by a health care professional that you're at risk for type 2 diabetes, you can prevent or delay the onset of the disease by losing 5 to 7 percent of your body weight (10 to 14 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds). To lose weight safely, make healthy food choices, like eating more fruits and vegetables, and be physically active for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) recommends easy and inexpensive ways to increase the number of fruits and vegetables you eat as you take small steps to lose weight and lower your diabetes risk:

• Visit an ethnic food store or farmer's market to try a new fruit or vegetable each week.

• Substitute spinach, onions, or mushrooms for one of the eggs or half of the cheese in omelets.

• Buy produce in season and freeze some to use later, or buy frozen, dried, or low-sodium canned vegetables and fruits. Choose fruit without added sugar or syrups and vegetables without added salt, butter, or sauces.

• Add strawberries, peaches, blueberries, or bananas to your waffles, pancakes, cereal, oatmeal, or toast.

• Add broccoli, carrots, zucchini, or eggplant between the layers of your favorite lasagna recipe.

• Combine different fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, mangos, onions, and peppers with lime juice and cilantro to make salsa.

• Try steaming your vegetables or using low-salt spices and lemon juice to add flavor.

• Choose pineapples, peppers, mushrooms, or tomatoes as pizza toppings.

• Add lettuce, tomato, onion, and cucumber to sandwiches, wraps, and burritos.

Eating more fruits and vegetables also supplies essential vitamins, minerals, and fiber that may help protect you from chronic diseases. To learn more about how many fruits and vegetables you need daily, use the online calculator at www.fruitsandveggiesmat ter.gov. For a free copy of NDEP's Your GAME PLAN to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes, which includes a fat and calorie counter and physical activity tracker, plus more diabetes prevention tips, call 1-888-693-NDEP (6337) or visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' National Diabetes Education Program is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations.

Eating more fruits and vegetables can help people with diabetes take small steps toward losing weight and lowering their risk for the disease.

By The National Diabetes Education Program

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Piedmont Hospital and Piedmont Fayette Hospital Receive Komen Foundation Grants

Piedmont Hospital and Piedmont Fayette Hospital have received funding from the Greater Atlanta Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure. The grants will be used to provide breast imaging services for underserved and underinsured women in the Atlanta area

“Piedmont is committed to providing state-of-the-art breast services to all women,” said Jeffrey Allen, M.D., medical director of the Doris Shaheen Breast Health Center at Piedmont Hospital. “We appreciate the support provided by the Atlanta affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure and are committed to meeting the needs of the community.”

Dr. Allen explained that a recent survey conducted by the Atlanta affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure demonstrated the marked underutilization of breast services in the Atlanta area by African-American and Latino women as well as indigent women of all races.

“To address this gap in crucial breast health services, the Doris Shaheen Breast Health Center at Piedmont Hospital and Women’s Imaging Center at Piedmont Fayette Hospital are providing free screening mammography, diagnostic mammography, breast ultrasound, ultrasound guided core biopsies, and stereotactic core biopsies to qualifying women,” he said. “A second grant is funding breast MRI and MRI-guided biopsies at Piedmont Hospital as well.”

Patients should be referred by a physician or can complete a form to see if they qualify at www.piedmonthospital.org/komen or www.fayettehospital.org/komen. If a patient qualifies and doesn’t have a physician, she will receive help finding a physician to follow her care. To learn more about the program and to check qualifications, call Suzette Wheeler at 404-352-1409, extension 304.

This year, Komen Atlanta awarded $2.25 million to 38 grantees in its 10-county service area. For more information on Susan G Komen or grants in your area, please visit www.komenatlanta.org.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
Community News You Can Use
Fayetteville, Peachtree City, Tyrone

Friday, June 13, 2008

Make family Reunions Healthy, Fun

Summertime is here. That means family reunions filled with food and fun are right around the corner. To stop that post-gathering bulge, families can cook healthier versions of traditional foods and include physical activities, says a University of Georgia expert.

Family reunions often include a lot of sitting around and eating foods high in fat, sugar and calories, says Connie Crawley, nutrition and health specialist with UGA Cooperative Extension.

The preparation methods and ingredients used in traditional reunion food can often be modified to make them healthier. For example, grilling chicken or fish instead of frying reduces calories and fat.

“People can look for healthier recipes in countless cookbooks on cooking lighter or modify their own recipes by using light margarine, reduced fat salad dressings, reduced fat cheese, light mayonnaise, brown rice and whole wheat pasta,” Crawley said.

Smoked turkey wings can be used to season in place of fatback or bacon. Entrees featuring skinless poultry, lean pork loin, lean ground beef or ground white meat or turkey can be used in place of fattier meats.

Potato salad made with light mayonnaise, macaroni and cheese made with reduced fat cheese, gelatin salads made with sugar-free gelatin and broccoli or squash casseroles made with lower sodium condensed soups and reduced-fat cheese are a few options to consider.

Alcohol can lead to an excess in calories at family gatherings, too, and may be consumed in larger than normal quantities. Too many sugary drinks like sweet tea, lemonade and soft drinks can be bad, too. Alternative choices such as sugar-free beverages and water are healthier options.

Overeating at family gatherings is also a problem. To prevent overeating, don’t go to the event too hungry.

“Eat a healthy breakfast and have a light snack, like fruit, one hour before the meal,” Crawley said. “Choose the smallest plate possible and fill one half with vegetables or salad, one fourth with a protein like meat, poultry or fish and one fourth with a starch or bread.”

It also helps to sit away from the buffet or serving table to avoid the temptation to get seconds. Move serving bowls off the table where the family will be eating. Once the meal is done, clear away all the food immediately so snacking on leftovers is minimized, Crawley said.

Another treat at family functions that is hard to resist is dessert. Alternatives to calorie-rich treats are angel food cake, fruit, reduced-fat ice cream, fruit smoothies, frozen fruit bars, fudgesicles and oatmeal or peanut butter cookies.

“Wait at least 20 minutes after the meal before selecting a dessert,” Crawley said. “You will feel less hungry and will be satisfied with a smaller portion.”

Families can also participate in physical activities that are not only fun, but help burn off part of a big meal. Family members can go on scavenger hunts, play kickball, swim, play flag football, take a walk in the neighborhood, ride bikes, play hide and seek, have sack races, dance, shop on foot or walk around a museum or historic site.

“You may want to offer several of these activities at the same time so everyone has the chance to choose the one that suits them best,” Crawley said. “These activities can get the whole family involved and provide a fun way to exercise during the summer.”

By Allie Byrd
University of Georgia

Allie Byrd is a student writer with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Thursday, June 05, 2008

Cancer Wellness at Piedmont’s Programs and Services for June

Cancer Wellness at Piedmont’s Programs and Services for June
Comprehensive Complementary Services Offered to Anyone Affected by Cancer

Cancer Wellness at Piedmont Hospital offers comprehensive services and programs for anyone affected by cancer at any phase in his or her journey. Classes offered every month include: Cancer Wellfit©, Gentle Yoga, Art Therapy, Guided Imagery and Relaxation for Optimal Health, Mindfulness Training 101 & 102, Breast Cancer Support, Gynecological Cancer Support, and A Guy’s Group For more information please visit www.piedmontcancerconnection.org or to make a reservation for one of the classes listed below, call Carolyn Helmer at 404-605-1962, and please indicate which classes you plan to attend.

Cancer Wellness at Piedmont Hospital events for June:
· Food for Life Nutrition and Cooking Class Series for Cancer Prevention and Survival (offered by The Cancer Project)- Fridays in June, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
· Understanding Acupuncture- Learn what it is and how it works. Thursday, June 19, 1 to 3 p.m.
· Poetry Reading and Reception in the Wellness CafĂ©- Bring poems or favorites written by others to share and enjoy. Friday, June 27, 5 to 7 p.m.

For more information and a full list of classes please visit www.piedmontcancerconnection.org.

Wednesday, June 04, 2008

Piedmont Fayette Hospital Hosts Blood Drive June 12

Summertime is the perfect time to donate blood!

Piedmont Fayette Hospital's Auxiliary will host an American Red Cross Blood Drive on Thursday, June 12, from noon until 5 p.m. It will be held in Building 1279, just west of the main hospital, at 1279 Highway 54 West, on the third floor, Conference Room C.

Eligible donors must be healthy, 17 years of age or older and weigh at least 110 pounds. Donors may give blood every 56 days, or six times a year. Donating blood is a simple process that saves more than 4 million American lives each year, according to the American Red Cross. Blood is needed every three seconds in the United States for emergency medical situations. Blood is always needed for the treatment of accident victims, cancer patients, hemophiliacs and surgery patients.

Please call the Piedmont Fayette Hospital Auxiliary office at (770) 719‑7098 for more information or to schedule your appointment. Walk‑ins are welcome; however appointments will be honored first.

Defuse Indoor Allergy Triggers

Spring has sprung the pollen season. Little can be done to control allergens outside. But you can knock out the ones inside with a bit of cleaning and prevention.

Many everyday items in homes trigger allergies, said Pamela Turner, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension housing specialist.

“The best way to prevent allergies is to remove the cause,” she said.

The usual culprits of an indoor allergy attack are unwanted guests like dust, mold, insects and rodents. But items you welcome into your home such as pets, household cleaners and even stuffed animals can be the source, too, Turner says.

There are simple things you can do to eliminate these causes.

Throw out pillows once a year and wash your sheets every week to get rid of dust mites. Dusty stuffed animals can also trigger allergies in children, the elderly and people with compromised immune systems.

“Stuffed animals are dust magnets,” Turner says. “To kill dust mites on stuffed animals, you can put them in a plastic bag and freeze them.”

Changing the air filters in your house every three months and replacing them with pleated filters, which catch more dust than regular filters, can make a huge difference in allergies.

Keeping your house below 60 percent humidity and cool helps prevent mold growth, Turner said. Mold grows better in warm, moist environments.

“You can bring outdoor allergy triggers inside,” Turner says.

The things you and your pets track into your house can cause reactions. Taking your shoes off when you come inside prevents you from bringing these contaminants into your home.

Many people sleep with their pets and have them in their bedrooms, Turner says. It is better to remove them from your sleeping space and bed to prevent them from triggering allergies.

In addition to removing the source of allergy triggers, the cleanliness of your house and the products you use to clean it also affect indoor allergies.

“Cleaning and getting rid of the dust in your house is a major way you can reduce allergic reactions,” Turner said. “Also, maintaining your house so you don’t have leaks and holes will prevent mold growth and keep pests from coming in.”

It also helps to declutter your home. A lot of stuff gives dust more surfaces to land on, Turner says.

Choose cleaning products wisely, she said. Some can cause reactions, too. Many people are allergic to volatile organic compounds in many household cleaners, even those found in what are called ‘green’ cleaners.

“Limit the number of cleaners you use,” she said, ”and don’t use too much of any product.”

Hepa vacuum cleansers also work well to reduce dust and dust mites, but just vacuuming regularly helps.

The most important part of keeping indoor allergies at bay is to keep your home clean and remove the sources of allergy triggers, she said.

By Allie Byrd
University of Georgia

Tuesday, June 03, 2008

Maternity Center at Piedmont Fayette Hospital Offers Classes for Expecting Parents

Parents and expectant parents are invited to attend several informative classes offered by the Maternity Center at Piedmont Fayette Hospital (PFH). For more information on the Maternity Center at PFH, visit www.fayettehospital.org. Community members are invited to take part in the following classes:

Prepared Childbirth Class - This course, recommended for women 20 to 28 weeks into pregnancy, provides an eight hour childbirth education class that teaches mom and her partner about what to expect during labor and delivery. The instructor will discuss the stages of labor, relaxation, breathing techniques, common concerns, comfort measures and much more. Participants will need to bring two pillows and a blanket or towel. The fee for the course is $85 and includes light refreshments. The class will be held Saturday, June 14 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Dietary Conference Room on the ground floor of the hospital. To sign-up call Link2Health toll-free at 1-866-900-4321. For more information call 770-719-6305.

Breastfeeding Basics - The Maternity Center at Piedmont Fayette Hospital offers a three hour group participation discussion on the benefits and how-to's of breastfeeding. This class includes preparing for breastfeeding and getting started in the hospital and at home, special situations and growing a breastfeeding family. The class is best if done prior to delivery, but participants are welcome at any time. Fathers and grandparents are welcomed and encouraged to attend also. This class is offered July 12, September 13 and November 8 at 9 a.m. in Conference Room C on the third floor of the hospital's 1279 Building. To sign-up call Link2Health toll-free at 1-866-900-4321. For more information call 770-719-6305.

Moms in Motion - “Moms in Motion” is a fitness program designed to prepare women for the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy and postpartum. The class combines low impact aerobics, toning exercises, relaxation and breathing techniques and appropriate warm-ups/cool-downs perfect for both pregnant and postpartum women. The program provides not only a safe and effective exercise regime, but also provides valuable information on pregnancy, postpartum and child safety. Participants may register for this ongoing program at any time during or after pregnancy. Classes are held every Tuesday and Thursday from 5:45 to 6:30 p.m. in Suite 200 of the Piedmont Fayette Hospital Fitness Center at 1250 Hwy 54 West. Space is limited. The classes are FREE to fitness center members, and $25 per month for non-members. Written approval from a physician is required. For more information or to register, call 770-719-7290.

Maternity Center Tours - The Maternity Center at Piedmont Fayette Hospital welcomes expectant mothers and their families to take a tour of the facility. The tour will be offered on Monday, June 2 and Saturday, June 14 from 6 to 7 p.m. The tour will provide information on the hospital's approach to maternity care and how physicians and staff help new mothers and their babies before and after delivery. Please meet in the Maternity Center lobby (third floor, enter through the West Entrance) and sign in. For more information call 770-719-6305.

Fayette County Safe Kids Child Passenger Safety Training Class - Fayette County Safe Kids will offer a car seat safety class to teach parents how to keep children safe, especially while traveling by car. The course will be offered Monday, June 9 and July 14 from 3 to 5 p.m. in Conference Room A on the third floor of the hospital's 1279 Building. This class is offered the second Monday of each month. For more information or to register, call 770-631-0743, ext. 150.