Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Surgeons Warn: Skateboarding Tough on Feet, Ankles

/PRNewswire/ -- Children and young adults love the thrill of skateboarding. They learn to master their skills of "riding the rail" and "catching air." But according to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), such tricks, while fun, can be physically demanding and cause serious foot and ankle injuries.

Foot and ankle surgeons around the country warn they continue to see serious lower-extremity skateboard injuries among their patients. These injuries range from minor bruises to open wounds or cuts to more serious foot and ankle sprains and fractures, which may require surgical repair.

Virginia-based foot and ankle surgeon, Jennifer Purvis, DPM, AACFAS, advises skateboarders to use caution and wear protective gear, including properly supportive shoes, when skateboarding. "Skateboarding can be particularly hard on your feet and ankles because of the impact caused when performing jumps and tricks," Dr. Purvis explains. "Skateboarders should be aware that the strain from repetitive, forceful motions can also cause painful foot and heel conditions such as plantar fasciitis, bone spurs and Achilles tendonitis, which may require more intensive, longer-term therapies," she said.

Even minor cuts or abrasions on your feet can cause serious problems. Dr. Purvis recently treated a 21-year-old skateboarder for scrapes on his feet and ankles that were not healing. Tests indicated he had contracted MRSA - a very serious and sometimes deadly staph infection, which required surgery and four weeks of antibiotic therapy.

Foot and ankle sprains and fractures are common skateboarding injuries. Karl Collins, DPM, FACFAS, who practices in St. Louis, stresses the importance of seeing a foot and ankle surgeon to ensure proper diagnosis and course of treatment for these injuries. Until you can be seen by a doctor, it is best to take a break from activities and use R.I.C.E. therapy (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation), which helps to reduce pain and control swelling around the injury.

"A common misconception about foot and ankle fractures is that if you can walk on the foot, there isn't a fracture," Dr. Collins said. "That's not always the case, and only a proper diagnosis can rule out a serious injury requiring an advanced treatment plan."

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Monday, June 29, 2009

Inguinal Hernia: A Treatable Problem

(NAPSI)-What is an inguinal hernia and how do you know if you have one? A bulge on one or both sides of your groin, the area between the belly and thigh; sharp pain, or pressure in the groin; and a burning or aching feeling at the site of the bulge are signs you might have an inguinal hernia.

What You Should Know

An inguinal hernia results when part of the small intestine pushes through a weak area in the lower belly muscles. Symptoms usually appear slowly and inguinal hernias tend to grow larger over time.

What to Do

Talk with your doctor if you think you have an inguinal hernia. The doctor will see if the hernia can be gently massaged back into its proper place in the belly. If not, you might need an operation to repair the hernia to put the hernia back in place.

For More Information

Visit the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse website at www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov for more information and free publications about inguinal hernia.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Friday, June 26, 2009

National Foundation for Transplants Urges Americans To Become Organ Donors

(BUSINESS WIRE)--The National Foundation for Transplants today re-launched the NFT Transplant Challenge to encourage individuals to register as organ donors.

There are currently 102,073 patients on the national waiting list for an organ transplant, and another name is added to the list every 11 minutes. Because there is a national shortage of registered donors, approximately 18 people die every day while waiting for a transplant.

The NFT Transplant Challenge, which first launched in April 2009 in honor of Donate Life Month, urges individuals to officially register as organ donors through their state donor registry. Studies show that while 90 percent of Americans say they support organ donation, only 35 percent of licensed drivers have taken the steps to become organ donors.

“Recently, national attention has turned toward transplants and the transplant process, and we wanted to use this opportunity to educate the public about this urgent need,” said Jackie D. Hancock Jr., NFT president. “At NFT, we help transplant patients fundraise to cover their expenses, but all the money in the world won’t help if there aren’t enough available organs. We created this challenge to draw attention to this health crisis and encourage people to give the gift of life.”

The goal of the Transplant Challenge is to register 100,000 individuals as organ donors, in honor of the patients waiting on the national list. Additionally, the Challenge hopes to raise $100,000 to assist NFT’s patients with their transplant expenses.

To accept the NFT Transplant Challenge, please visit www.transplants.org and click on the Transplant Challenge logo.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page
www.artsacrossgeorgia.com
Arts Across Georgia

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Michael Jackson's Death Underscores the Tragedy and Impact of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

/PRNewswire/ -- The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Association said Thursday that pop singer Michael Jackson's death at the age of 50 underscores the tragedy of sudden cardiac arrest, which kills nearly 300,000 Americans each year and is the nation's leading cause of death.

"Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the result of an electrical disruption of the heart and is different than a heart attack. It can strike seemingly healthy individuals without warning, including those with no known history of heart disease. SCA kills an American once every two minutes and can happen virtually anytime and anywhere. Nearly 80 percent of all sudden cardiac arrests occur in the home, like in Mr. Jackson's case. Even though Mr. Jackson's collapse was apparently witnessed, emergency medical services responded promptly and Mr. Jackson's home was near UCLA Medical Center, it was still not sufficient to revive Mr. Jackson because SCA victims usually need immediate CPR and the shock of an automated external defibrillator (AED) if they are to have any chance of survival. Today's news should be a reminder that CPR is a basic life-saving skill that everyone should know, and that AEDs should be widely deployed to enhance the chance of survival."

For more information, please visit www.suddencardiacarrest.org.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Hand Washing with 4% CHG Antiseptic Kills Flu Viruses

/PRNewswire/ -- Hand washing with a 4% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) antiseptic hand washing product is one effective way to stop the spread of the H1N1 Swine Flu Virus.

Hibiclens Antiseptic/Antimicrobial Skin Cleanser and Hibistat Healthcare Personnel Hand Antiseptic Towelettes have been tested and found to be effective against a variation of the A H1N1 Swine Flu Virus, when used according to package instructions. The strain tested was Swine Flu Influenza A H1N1 A/Swine/Iowa/15/3.

The time-kill study, conducted by an independent laboratory showed that Hibiclens(R), a 4% CHG product, reduced the virus by 99.94 percent after 30 second, 60 second, and three minute exposures. Hibistat(R), a 0.5% CHG and 70% isopropyl alcohol formulation, reduced the virus by 99.99 percent after 15 second, 30 second and 60 second exposures. Both Hibiclens and Hibistat were more effective than soap and water which was used as a comparator test product.

"With any type of influenza outbreak, managing the spread of virus is the biggest concern," said Carolyn Twomey, RN, Global Head of Clinical Services, Molnlycke Health Care. "Influenza viruses usually spread via sneezing and coughing and contaminating one's hand or hands, and then touching surfaces, shaking hands or other contact behaviors. With any influenza outbreak, good hand hygiene is extremely important. With the current strains of flu virus, this study shows that washing with Hibiclens or using Hibistat Hand Wipes provides additional benefit in preventing transmission."

"Use of Molnlycke Health Care's Hibiclens and Hibistat antimicrobial/antiseptic products, along with the company's line of surgical facemasks and respirators, can be an integral part of a protocol to reduce the risk of cross-contamination," Twomey said.

Hibiclens is an antimicrobial/antiseptic cleanser that kills germs on contact and bonds with the skin to keep killing microorganisms for up to six hours without leaving a residue. The same cleanser combined with alcohol is available in convenient Hibistat(R) towelettes. Both are available at drug stores and pharmacies in the first aid section.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Keeping Bones And Joints Healthy

(NAPSI)-A skeleton seems so hard and durable that it can be difficult to believe that bone is living tissue-constantly forming and reforming in response to growth, injury and other factors. Bone is built up and strengthened where needed and removed where it is not required, in an ongoing fashion.

Up until about 30 years of age, this tug-of-war favors bone buildup. When bone is being built, calcium-the primary mineral stored in bone-is pulled from the bloodstream to form new bone, which is why adequate intake during this time is so important. Vitamin D also plays a critical role by helping the body to absorb calcium.

Physical changes and changes in diet and lifestyle that occur with age can affect skeletal health, tipping the balance toward bone breakdown. Calcium and vitamin D deficits, inactivity and smoking, for example, can all affect bone density.

Joints are affected by age, too. The cartilage that smoothly covers the ends of the bone gets thinner. Production of glucosamine sulfate, a natural compound made by the body that helps form this cartilage "cushion," also decreases with age.

"Keeping bones healthy is important for all ages," notes Luigi Gratton, M.D. "But," he adds, "adequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D are important throughout life, and many adults don't consume enough of these nutrients on a regular basis to meet needs."

The best thing younger people can do is aim for three to four servings of dairy products daily during peak bone growth. Calcium needs remain high into adulthood, but many people do not take in enough from dietary sources. Supplementing with products such as Herbalife's Xtra-Cal® Advanced, which contains an extended-release form of calcium and 100 percent of the daily value of vitamin D, can help meet needs.

Weight-bearing activities-such as walking or jogging-along with strength-training exercise also help to build and maintain healthy bones. Strong muscles can help absorb some of the stresses put on joints through daily activities. Products such as Herbalife's® Joint Support Advanced can help to supplement the body's natural production of glucosamine and support joint health.

Staying active, eating right and taking supplements when needed will give you the best chance of maintaining your skeletal health -no bones about it.


-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Saturday, June 20, 2009

Free Resource For Consumers Considering LASIK Available On EyeSmart™ Web Site

(NAPSI)-The American Academy of Ophthalmology (Academy), the International Society of Refractive Surgery (ISRS) and Ophthalmic Mutual Insurance Company have produced a free 15-page guide on LASIK. Consumers who are thinking about whether to have LASIK now have a new resource to help them with their decision. "Is Lasik for Me?: A Patient's Guide to Refractive Surgery" offers objective and balanced information about refractive surgery, as well as links to other documents that patients may find useful.

Each year, approximately 700,000 Americans have LASIK and the vast majority are happy with their results. As with all surgery, however, there are risks associated with the procedure. The information in the guide is intended to help potential LASIK candidates:

• Understand what LASIK is

• Be aware of what would make a person a good or poor candidate for LASIK

• Be aware of and understand the possible risks and complications of LASIK

• Select a surgeon

• Evaluate LASIK advertising

• Become familiar with the Informed Consent process.

"This is a great comprehensive tool for consumers considering LASIK," said David W. Parke II, M.D., executive vice president and CEO of the Academy. "We hope that anyone who is considering LASIK will find this a beneficial and educational component for helping to make the decision."

In addition to the guide, the Academy also developed a K card for patients who have undergone LASIK surgery. The card, which is to be kept by the patient, captures a patient's preoperative keratometry readings (the curvature of the cornea) and refraction. It is often difficult to track down this critical data years later, when the patient is in need of cataract surgery or additional eye care. "The K card should be an important element of a LASIK patient's health records," said Dr. Parke.

"Is LASIK for Me?" and the K card are available at http://www.geteyesmart.org.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Friday, June 19, 2009

Relief For Certain Problems During Pregnancy

(NAPSI)-According to the Centers for Disease Control, there are over 4 million births in the United States a year.

While many women enjoy that famous "glow," others discover the not-so-glowing side effects and complications that can occur. Here are a few and what to do about them.

Un-Holy Heartburn: Due to hormonal and physical changes, many pregnant women experience heartburn (sometimes called acid indigestion or acid reflux). To alleviate or at least minimize the symptoms, try avoiding carbonated, drinks, alcohol, caffeine, and acidic foods such as fruits, tomatoes and processed meats. Drinking large quantities of liquids during meals can cause your stomach to distend. To help keep the gastric acid from rising into the esophagus, sleep propped up with pillows so the head is raised higher than the feet.

Excessive Gas and Bloating: These can be caused by increased hormones (specifically progesterone) relaxing the digestive tract. Try eating five small meals throughout the day rather than three big ones. If you can, figure out which foods cause excess gas and either eliminate them or spread out eating them throughout the day. Limit the amount of carbonated beverages you drink and have your beverages in a cup or glass rather than through a straw to avoid sucking in extra air.

Avoiding and Treating Hemorrhoids: Suffered by approximately 20 percent of the adult population in general, for many women they can arrive either during pregnancy or in the second stage of labor. There are ways to lessen your chances for getting them and ease your discomfort if you do.

Eating a high-fiber diet (with foods that include fruit, beans and vegetables), drinking eight to 10 glasses of water a day and getting regular exercise can help decrease the incidence of constipation that commonly leads to hemorrhoids. Sitting for a long time can aggravate the condition, so try lying on your left side to increase blood return from the lower half of your body. Over-the-counter products such as Tucks Medicated Pads can provide immediate relief from itching and burning associated with hemorrhoids, while soothing and protecting irritated areas with the active ingredient witch hazel.

"For all of the embarrassing side effects that may pop up during pregnancy, most women who experience these things will happily tell you that they forget them soon after giving birth," said Dr. Isabel Blumberg, OB/GYN Mount Sinai Medical Center. "The important thing to remember is that they are not set in stone to occur, are very treatable if they do and will leave your memory quickly after you bring home the newest (and littlest) member of your household."

For more information, visit www.tucksbrand.com.


-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Beating the summer bummer of bug bites and bee stings

(ARA) - Ahhh, summer -- July Fourth fireworks, family barbecues, ice cold watermelon, weekends at the beach ... and bug bites. Or worse -- bee, hornet and wasp stings.

“Dealing with biting and stinging insects is one of summer’s bummers,” says Dr. Christopher Van Tilburg, editor of Wilderness Medicine magazine and the author of eight books on outdoor safety. “At best, a bite is annoying and a sting painful. At worst, they can be life-threatening if the person that was bitten or stung has an allergic reaction.”

Repellents can help ward off insects, but even the most powerful are not foolproof if you miss a patch of skin. A summer mosquito bite or bee sting is almost inevitable and can be annoying to adult sufferers and traumatizing to the youngest members of the family.

Van Tilburg offers some tips to help ensure insect bites and stings don’t take a bite out of your summer fun:

* Wash the bite or sting with soap and water. Keep an eye out for infection. If the bite or sting becomes increasingly red or painful, swells or oozes pus, or if the red spot is bigger than a nickel, have a doctor look at it.

* Apply an anti-itch treatment designed specifically for insect bites and stings. Oral antihistamines may help, but also carry the risk of making one drowsy, so stick with a topical remedy. Avoid those that rely on benzocaine or lidocaine, both of which simply mask the itch and need to be constantly reapplied since the relief is short lived. Instead, opt for a benzocaine-free product like AfterBite.

The adult version counteracts the bite with ammonia and the children’s version (AfterBite Kids) gently eliminates the pain and swelling with a baking soda-based cream. Both formulations work to soothe the bite -- providing fast, long-term relief -- and help moisturize the skin. AfterBite contains mineral oil and the kids' version comes with Vitamin E, aloe vera and tea tree oil -- all ingredients that are effective skin softeners. Tea tree oil also kills bacteria, which is an important benefit if a child’s insect bite or sting has become infected through over scratching. If you don’t have a remedy on hand, apply ice or cold to relieve the pain and swelling.

* In case of a sting, remove the stinger and venom sac as quickly as possible. The venom sac will continue to pump venom into the skin, even if you’ve already removed the rest of the insect. If you don’t have extra strength AfterBite Outdoor (which contains baking soda, tea tree oil and ammonia) available, make a paste of baking soda and water and apply it to the affected area for bee stings. For wasps, try vinegar, lemon juice or another acidic substance that may help neutralize the pain-causing toxin.

* Bee, hornet or wasp stings (and some ant bites) can lead to anaphylactic shock, a serious life-threatening allergic reaction. Symptoms include hives, wheezing, dizziness, tightness in the chest, a rapid heart beat and a drop in blood pressure. Anaphylactic shock requires immediate treatment with epinephrine and antihistamines. If someone in your family has a known bee allergy, be sure to keep an epinephrine auto-injector -- prescribed by your doctor -- on hand. Seek medical assistance as soon as possible.

* Bugs aren’t the only stinging creatures to be cautious about during summer months. If your family romps at the beach, beware of jellyfish stings. Some types of jellyfish deliver stings that are merely painful, while a handful can actually give a life-threatening sting. Use AfterBite or vinegar to neutralize jellyfish venom.

“Bites and stings are a reality of summer, but with a little preparedness and proper treatment, they don’t have to be a big bummer,” Van Tilburg says.

To learn more about treating summer insect bites and stings, visit www.tendercorp.com.

Courtesy of ARAcontent

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Monday, June 08, 2009

Dermatologist Shares Tips And Advice For Skin Care

(NAPSI)-Just as your wardrobe changes with each season, so should your skin care habits, especially when it comes to sensitive areas such as the underarms, neck and feet.

"Preparing skin can be accomplished in a few simple steps. Start by examining your current beauty routine to ensure that often neglected areas of the skin are getting properly pampered," says dermatologist and co-author of "The Beauty Prescription," Dr. Debra Luftman. She offers the following tips:

Take Care Under There: Stubble and irritation are just a few of the things that stand between women and attractive underarms. No matter the season, underarm care should be included as part of a woman's skin care routine.

Dr. Luftman Tip: Care for delicate underarm skin with a deodorant that multitasks, such as new Dove Ultimate Visibly Smooth, which helps to minimize the look and feel of underarm hair over time. It combines a unique Pro-Epil™ Complex with natural extracts and Dove ¼ Translucent Moisturizers™ to help women feel stubble-free for longer while still offering 24-hour odor and wetness protection. Women seeking prescription-strength wetness protection can try Dove Visibly Smooth Clinical Protection in Wild Rose, which provides the strongest defense against embarrassing odor and wetness from Dove.

Do Not Neglect the Neck: Many women spend time and money on skin care for their face but neglect the skin area below: the neck. Signs of aging tend to be most noticeable on the neck because the skin is some of the thinnest on the body and has little natural moisture. Lack of proper skin care and sun overexposure can result in dryness and a lack of elasticity.

Dr. Luftman Tip: Protect delicate neck skin from signs of aging by using a daily moisturizer with SPF to avoid sun spots and uneven pigmentation.

Treat Your Toes: Sandals, while comfortable and fashionable, leave feet exposed to the elements and can cause harsh blisters and dry skin.

Dr. Luftman Tip: Most people forget to put sunscreen on the tops of their feet, which can lead to painful and potentially serious burns. Prevent sun damage by applying SPF to feet every time you leave the house. Avoid uncomfortable and unsightly blisters by applying petroleum jelly to the areas of feet where blisters are prone. It will help prevent the friction that occurs between sandal straps and skin.

Learn about other skin care tips plus information about a new beauty treatment, the PitiCure™, at dove.us/visiblysmooth.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Saturday, June 06, 2009

Simple Steps Toward A Healthier Lifestyle

(NAPSI)-Small, simple steps can add up to big benefits when it comes to living a healthier life.

"Making simple lifestyle changes to improve your health is easier than people think," says Wendy Bazilian, DrPH, M.A., RD, author of "The Superfoods Rx Diet." "For example, taking a four-minute walk or adding 300 steps each day adds up to an extra mile by the end of the week.

"At mealtime," notes Bazilian, "it's easy to enhance the nutritional value of favorite foods by adding antioxidant-rich spices and herbs. Even something as simple-and flavorful-as shaking cinnamon onto coffee grounds before brewing is enough to make a difference."

Just one-half teaspoon of ground cinnamon has as many antioxidants as one-half cup raspberries or strawberries. Cinnamon is one of the McCormick Super Spices highlighted for their antioxidants, which are comparable to many fruits and vegetables, including today's "super foods" such as blueberries and spinach. Other Super Spices are ginger, oregano, red peppers (including cayenne, crushed red pepper and paprika), rosemary, thyme and yellow curry.

Spices can help boost the antioxidant power of practically everything throughout the day, from snacks and entrées to soups and beverages. Here are seven super tips to help:

1. Sprinkle ground cinnamon over everything from hot cocoa to oatmeal and fruit salad.

2. Quench your thirst with ginger lemonade. Add ½ teaspoon ground ginger to 1 quart freshly squeezed lemonade or lemonade from a mix.

3. For a twist on the typical grilled cheese, prepare sandwich with sliced mozzarella cheese, sliced tomato and ¼ teaspoon oregano leaves.

4. Add a kick to store-bought or homemade hummus or guacamole by stirring in ¼ teaspoon ground red pepper or crushed red pepper. Or sprinkle in paprika.

5. Dress up ready-to-bake rolls. Just before baking dinner rolls, brush tops with olive oil then sprinkle with crushed rosemary leaves and sea salt.

6. Wake up your taste buds with herbed scrambled eggs. Beat 1/8 teaspoon thyme leaves into 2 eggs before scrambling.

7. Create a spiced curried pilaf by adding ½ teaspoon yellow curry to 2 cups hot cooked rice. Add flavor and texture with a handful of shredded carrots, peas, raisins or toasted sliced almonds.

For more tips and recipes, visit www.spicesforhealth.com.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Thursday, June 04, 2009

Overweight male teens with normal blood pressures showing signs of heart damage

Even while their blood pressures are still normal, overweight male teens may have elevated levels of a hormone known to increase pressures as well as early signs of heart damage, researchers say.

Medical College of Georgia researchers looking at 126 healthy 15- to17-year-olds in high school in Augusta, Ga., found the hormone aldosterone highest among the overweight males. Early intervention could help these young people avoid growing up to be adults with cardiovascular disease, the number one killer in the United States.

"These associations give us reason to question whether we should be screening for and treating high aldosterone in obese males with normal pressures, particularly those with a family history of cardiovascular disease," MCG Endocrinology Fellow Dayal D. Raja says of the collaborative study with the Department of Pediatrics.

“Our failure to halt the progression of heart damage is attributed to late detection, because early heart damage is usually asymptomatic," Dr. Raja says. "We have evidence that we could identify individuals early and stop or even reverse that damage. We need more study to confirm our findings and a plan for whom and how to screen."

This first evidence of elevated aldosterone levels and early heart damage in a pediatric population with normal blood pressure earned Dr. Raja first place in the poster session at the recent American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists 18th Annual Meeting and Clinical Congress in Houston.

Aldosterone, a hormone produced by the adrenal gland, is known to increase blood pressure by increasing sodium and water retention. Despite normal blood pressures, the overweight males had thickened heart walls and an increase in the size of the pumping chamber of the heart, Dr. Raja says. Structural changes in the young hearts can be linked to a lesser-known aldosterone fact: it also promotes inflammation and formation of fibrous tissue in the heart muscle.

Overweight females in the group did not have elevated aldosterone levels or the associated heart damage, Dr. Raja says, noting that estrogen's cardioprotective effect may have made the difference.

Blood and urine test are available to measure aldosterone levels, but they typically aren't measured unless a patient on multiple medications still has uncontrolled blood pressure. By then, Dr. Raja says, significant cardiovascular damage may have been done.

It's more likely, young, overweight people would be told to lose weight, but that isn't working for most, Dr. Raja says. "We are trying weight loss but we are failing miserably," he says, noting the worldwide obesity epidemic. In fact, since that's today's standard, losing weight is just what these researchers told their study participants to do. Losing weight – if it happens – will decrease aldosterone levels.

Although the exact relationship between increased fat and increased aldosterone is still being sorted out, the latest research suggests that fat cells stimulate the adrenal glands to make more aldosterone, says Dr. Gregory Harshfield, director of MCG's Georgia Prevention Institute and a hypertension researcher.

As a follow up to Dr. Raja's study, Dr. Harshfield wants to block aldosterone levels in overweight teens with a family history of cardiovascular disease to determine if it can prevent or reverse dangerous heart changes and forestall hypertension. The GPI already is doing similar studies blocking the kidney's production of the powerful blood vessel constrictor angiotensin in young people with an impaired ability to secrete sodium.

The landmark 1999 RALE trial illustrated the potential benefit of reducing aldosterone levels even in people already suffering from heart failure. The study of 1,663 patients was halted early because of significantly reduced death rates in those taking the aldosterone-lowering, anti-hypertensive spironolactone. Patients on other anti-hypertensives failed to show as impressive results.

Co-investigators on the new study include Dr. Harshfield; Dr. Gaston Kapuku, cardiovascular researcher and co-director of MCG's Cardiovascular Discovery Institute; and Dr. Jennifer Pedersen-White, endocrinologist and Dr. Raja's preceptor on the project.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Tuesday, June 02, 2009

Treat Summer Ailments with Epsom Salt

(BUSINESS WIRE)--Epsom salt has long been considered one of the most versatile household products, but as summer draws near, doctors say there’s an important use that isn’t as well-known: reducing the itch that comes from mosquito bites, bee stings, mild sunburn, poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac.

“Basically, anything that itches or burns the skin, Epsom salt can soothe,” says Dr. Joe Matusic, a pediatrician in Charleston, W.Va., and an assistant clinical professor of pediatrics at the Charleston division of the West Virginia University School of Medicine. “It’s inexpensive, it’s readily available and it’s an old-time remedy that works.”

Epsom salt can be used to help reduce itching in three ways, according to Matusic and other doctors:

* Make compresses by soaking a cotton washcloth in cold water that has been mixed with Epsom salt (two tablespoons per cup), then apply to the skin.
* Create a paste to apply to the skin by adding a teaspoon of Epsom salt to about a cup of hot water until it dissolves, then chilling the solution in the fridge for 20 minutes. Note: Clean the skin and pat dry before applying the paste.
* Take an Epsom salt bath, by adding two cups of Epsom salt to the water in a standard-sized bathtub and soaking for at least 12 minutes. The Epsom salt will dissolve quicker if you put it under the running water.

“Epsom salt is always there in the pantry, and you should use it as soon as possible for temporary relief,” says Dr. Susan Jewell, an award-winning doctor and scientist in clinical research medicine. “I use it myself.”

Epsom salt helps draw the moisture out of lesions caused by rashes, such as poison ivy, according to the doctors. And with bites or stings, Epsom salt reduces the swelling, which eases the itching sensation because the body’s nerves fire less frequently, the doctors say.

People should consult their doctors for serious or persisting skin conditions.

-----
Community News You Can Use
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page
www.politicalpotluck.com
Political News You Can Use

June is Home Safety Month and DHR urges older adults to practice safety to prevent injuries

June is Home Safety Month and the Georgia Department of Human Resources, Division of Aging Services is urging older adults to practice safety to prevent injuries. In 2005, there were 15,800 people 65 and older who died from injuries related to unintentional falls. About 1.8 million in this same age group were treated in emergency rooms and more than 433,000 of these patients were hospitalized. About 20 to 30 percent of the people who fall suffer moderate to severe injuries like bruises, hip fractures, or head trauma according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Experts suggest various things that older adults can do to reduce their risk of falling such as:

Exercising regularly to increase strength and improve balance;
Having regular eye examinations at least once a year;
Removing throw rugs or using non- slip backing so they won’t slip;
Keeping objects like books, towels, shoes, magazines and blankets off the floor;
Putting overhead lights at the top and bottom of stairs;
Fixing any loose or uneven steps on the stairs; and
Adding a non-slip rubber mat or self-stick strips to the bathtub or shower.

"We encourage older individuals, at risk adults, persons with disabilities, and their families to use safety precautions to avoid falls," said Maria Greene, Director of the Division of Aging Services.

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page

Monday, June 01, 2009

When Lawn Mowers Attack: National Medical Societies Offer Tips to Prevent Injuries; Children Often Victims

/PRNewswire / -- Using a lawn mower can be as routine as bike riding or barbeques during spring and summer. But often, people find themselves in terrifying situations with these seemingly safe household machines. In fact, 200,000 people - 16,000 of them children - are injured in lawn mower-related accidents each year, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission reports. However, lawn mowers don't "attack" on their own. Most injuries - such as severed fingers and toes, limb amputations, broken bones, burns and eye injuries - are caused by careless use and can be prevented by following a few simple safety tips.

The American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery (ASRM), American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons (ASMS), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) have teamed up to prevent injuries and educate adults and children about the importance of lawn mower safety during National Safety Month, June 2009.

"In 19 years of practice as a plastic surgeon and microsurgeon, some of the most devastating and disabling injuries I've treated are from lawn mower accidents," said ASRM President William Zamboni, MD. "It's especially concerning when children are injured since most of these injuries are preventable."

Many lawn mower-related injuries require a team of physicians from various specialties - plastic surgery, microsurgery, maxillofacial surgery, pediatrics, and orthopaedics - to properly repair them. Often, patients must endure painful reconstructive operations for months, sometimes years, to restore form and function.

"Power lawn mowers are dangerous adult tools, but many children, and sometimes adults unfortunately, see them as toys," said ASPS President John Canady, MD. "Lawn mowing can be dangerous to the operator as well as those nearby if proper safety precautions aren't taken. Physicians in this coalition often repair these heart wrenching injuries, and we feel it's our duty to help people avoid these accidents in the first place."

The ASRM, ASPS, ASMS, AAP and AAOS offer the following tips to help prevent lawn mower-related injuries:

-- Children should be at least 12-years-old before they operate any lawn
mower, and at least 16- years-old for a ride-on mower.
-- Children should never be passengers on ride-on mowers.
-- Always wear sturdy shoes while mowing - not sandals.
-- Young children should be at a safe distance from the area you are
mowing.
-- Pick up stones, toys and debris from the lawn to prevent injuries from
flying objects.
-- Always wear eye and hearing protection.
-- Use a mower with a control that stops it from moving forward if the
handle is released.
-- Never pull backward or mow in reverse unless absolutely necessary -
carefully look for others behind you when you do.
-- Start and refuel mowers outdoors - not in a garage. Refuel with the
motor turned off and cool.
-- Blade settings should be set by an adult only.
-- Wait for blades to stop completely before removing the grass catcher,
unclogging the discharge chute, or crossing gravel roads. (As a safety
feature, some newer models have a blade/brake clutch that stops the
blade each time the operator releases the handle.)


"We are pleased to be part of this lawn mower injury prevention coalition," said ASMS President Kevin Kelly, MD. "Maxillofacial plastic surgeons treat numerous facial injuries caused by lawn mowers, particularly to children, and the effects can be devastating. Very often, we see patients who suffer significant facial injuries by items thrown out of mowers like sticks and stones."

-----
www.fayettefrontpage.com
Fayette Front Page
www.georgiafrontpage.com
Georgia Front Page
www.artsacrossgeorgia.com
Arts Across Georgia