Thursday, October 01, 2009

Center for Autism and Related Disorders Research Study Finds Chewing Gum an Effective Treatment for Rumination in Children with Autism

/24-7/ -- According to new research conducted by the Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc. (CARD), the "Chewing Gum as a Treatment for Rumination in a Child with Autism" study reveals the challenging behavior of rumination can be treated effectively by using chewing gum as a replacement behavior. The study is published in the current issue of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis.

Rumination involves regurgitation of previously ingested food, re-chewing the food, and re-swallowing it. The study examined a child with autism who displayed chronic rumination for approximately one year, resulting in the decay and subsequent removal of several teeth. After several treatments failed, including thickened liquids and starch satiation, the child was taught to chew gum. His rumination decreased significantly when gum was made available.

"The key findings of this research study are significant for both parents and practitioners," says researcher Denise Rhine, MS ED, BCBA. "The findings suggest that access to chewing gum may be an effective and practical treatment for rumination in some individuals with."

The complete "Chewing Gum as a Treatment for Rumination in a Child with Autism" study is published in the summer 2009 Edition of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, pages 381-385. The study is also online at http://seab.envmed.rochester.edu/jaba/toc/cur/jabacurrent.php.

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